McDonald’s Donut Sticks Are *Temporarily* Here to Make Your Mornings a Little Sweeter

McDonald's Donut Sticks Are *Temporarily* Here to Make Your Mornings a Little Sweeter

McDonald’s is now in the doughnut-making business, and Dunkin’ Donuts might have some competition. From sweet potato fries in Australia to cheesy potato bites and Instagram-worthy McFloats in Japan, McDonald’s has pioneered treats for fast-food-lovers worldwide. Now, the fast-food giant is sending some love to its United States fans with new cinnamon sugar McCafé Donut Sticks. These indulgent churro-style treats will be available on the McDonald’s breakfast menu starting Feb. 20 for a limited time, because the world can only handle so much fried, doughy goodness.

The crispy doughnuts will be made fresh each morning at participating McDonald’s locations and sold by the dozen and half-dozen. McDonald’s customers can even get a special discount when pairing a half-dozen Donut Sticks with a small McCafé brewed coffee for only $1.99, similar to Dunkin’ Donuts’ $2 deal. So for anyone who’s already a fan of the restaurant’s bakery items — like McDonald’s morning coffee cakes and muffin toppers — cinnamon sugar doughnuts are really the only logical step forward, right?

Costco Sells Heart-Shaped Macarons For Valentine’s Day, and We’ll Take 20 Boxes, Please

McDonald’s originally began testing the Donut Sticks in early 2018 and again in October 2018 in select Illinois restaurants. Now, the long-rumored sweet treats are officially available nationwide for all McDonald’s fans to enjoy. So get ’em while they’re hot!

Advertisements

New Citroen concept could be driven without a licence

New Citroen concept could be driven without a licence

Citroen has unveiled a tiny city car concept ahead of its public debut at the Geneva motor show next month.

The Ami One is a two-seat show car that meets Europe’s quadricycle regulations. That means it’s less than 1.5m wide, has a top speed of 28mph (45 kph) and weighs less than 450kg. As a result, it could, in some countries, be driven without a driving licence.

The concept explores some of the issues facing makers of very small cars as consumers turn to bigger models or stop buying cars entirely.

“The young are connected to use, not ownership,” said Citroën’s senior vice-president of product and strategy, Xavier Peugeot. “To me, Ami One is not a car. There are people for who mobility is not an object.”

The Ami One is intended to be a vehicle whose use would be shared at least as much as it’s privately owned, so it is built simply and cheaply and to be tough.

“The materials are all chosen for durability,” said Frederic Duvernier, Citroen’s head of concept cars, who led the design of the Ami One.

To cut production costs, there’s a huge reduction in the number of components required to make the Ami One. The front and rear windows are different but otherwise, body panels are common across sides wherever possible.

Both doors are the same, so the driver’s door is rear-hinged, the passenger side conventional; the orange panels below the windscreen and rear window are common; the chevron-ribbed sills are common across four sides; and every wheel arch is an identical moulding. Exterior badging is all by decal and the rear lights use only two LEDs apiece.

Onboard electrical content is paired back, too. The Ami One integrates with the entertainment and navigation systems of a smartphone, whose screen it mirrors onto a head-up display and which the driver controls by voice. That and the instruments are where the car’s only interior electrics lie. The windows are either open or closed, not electrically operated, and the 2CV-style fold-back roof is hand operated.

According to Citroen CEO Linda Jackson, although the Ami One is not cited for production, it does explore what Citroën’s city cars could become, given the segment’s dwindling number of buyers.

“When you see the size of the segment, and people moving to B-segment and B-SUVs, we’ll not straight replace the C1,” she said. “What is the evolution? We’re talking urban areas and car sharing, though you might want ownership. Anything for cities means electric. We need to look at the A-segment and what is the next answer. Maybe it is the Ami One.”

The Ami One won’t just be static at the Geneva show but will be driven around the stand.

The four-cylinder BMW Z4 is an exercise in ‘less is more’

The four-cylinder BMW Z4 is an exercise in 'less is more'

The new Z4 is a return to form for . When I drove the twin-turbocharged, six-cylinder M40i version last year, I said it was one of the company’s “best-executed sports cars yet.” Following a quick sampling of the less-powerful Z4 sDrive30i last week, I’m pleased to say that praise extends to this four-cylinder model, as well. And in fact, for a number of reasons, I actually like the 30i more.

Powering the Z4 sDrive30i is the same 2.0-liter, turbocharged, four-cylinder engine that’s found in a whole bunch of other new BMWs, and it’s a real sweetheart. It’s part of the reason why I prefer the 2019 330i to its more powerful M340i sibling. With a bit of extra boost, this engine turns the otherwise milquetoast X2 into the super-entertaining M35i.

In the Z4, this engine produces 255 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. Yes, that’s 127 fewer horsepower and 74 fewer pound-feet than the twin-turbo I6 used in the Z4 M40i, but in action, the 30i doesn’t feel underpowered. BMW says the Z4 sDrive30i does the 0-60 mile-per-hour dash in a quick 5.2 seconds — 1.3 seconds slower than the M40i. But the seat-of-the-pants feeling as I stomp the throttle and take off down an empty farm road near Thermal, California is in no way lackluster. Peak torque arrives at just 1,500 rpm and remains strong up past 4,000. Mid-range punch is impressive. The eight-speed automatic transmission drops a gear or two with immediacy, and you’re plunged right back into the deep end of that torque pool.

The smaller engine means the Z4 sDrive30i is 156 pounds lighter than its M40i sibling, and all that weight comes right off the nose. Pop the hood and you’ll notice the I4 engine is nestled as far back toward the firewall as possible, helping to achieve a perfect 50:50 weight balance.

Like the M40i, the Z4 sDrive30i is really enjoyable to drive. The steering is quick to react to inputs, with lots of feedback delivered back to your palms. Chassis tuning is on the softer side of sporty, but I don’t mind it on the soaking wet, pockmarked roads of California’s Coachella Valley. That’s especially helpful considering the car rolls on large, 19-inch wheels wrapped in Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires, P255/35R19 up front and P275/35R19 out back. Not exactly the most forgiving wheel-and-tire setup.

The 2.0-liter engine may be small, but it packs a wallop. Steven Ewing/Roadshow

Higher-speed track testing will surely reveal the benefits of the more powerful M40i setup, but honestly, the Z4 isn’t that kind of car. It’s a cruiser — a roadster that’s at its best on winding roads. Blasting down California’s 111 highway near the Salton Sea, I can’t say I’m missing the extra power of the twin-turbo M40i.

Practically speaking, the four-cylinder Z4 doesn’t give anything up as far as comfort and amenities are concerned. The 30i’s interior is just as comfy-cozy as the M40i, and still every bit as claustrophobic with the top up. (As you can see from the accompanying photos, it wasn’t exactly top-down weather.) I like the way this tester’s red leather seats contrast with the matte gray exterior, even if it’s a bit too burlesque for some tastes. The bits of black and polished metal trim are high quality and feel great to the touch, and all vehicle controls are arranged neatly and logically. Then again, it’s not like there’s a whole lot of room for spread-out buttonry in the Z4’s small interior.

BMW’s iDrive 7 infotainment tech is along for the ride, too, with a 10.25-inch touchscreen sitting atop the dash, complemented by a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster. I really like this updated system — it’s pleasing to the eye and easy to navigate, whether operated by touch or via the console-mounted knob. (You can also use gesture controls, but I never, ever, ever do.)

BMW’s iDrive 7 tech is a highlight of the Z4’s well-appointed cabin. Steven Ewing/Roadshow

At no point does driving the Z4 sDrive30i feel like a compromise. It’s slower than the M40i, sure, but I don’t really feel like I’m missing out on some vastly different experience. Z4 M40i pricing isn’t available yet, but it’ll no doubt command several thousand dollars more than the 30i’s $49,700 starting price. Unless you really have to have that extra I6 power, this early test makes me think the vast majority of buyers will be just as happy with the 30i.

Finally, lest you think I’d publish a story without mentioning its brother from another mother, the , know that my sDrive30i experience is relevant here, too. Toyota will offer BMW’s 2.0-liter turbo engine in the Supra in other markets, but it won’t be coming to the US — at least, not initially. I haven’t driven the Supra in twin-turbo I6 guise, but I hear it behaves a lot like the Z4 (in prototype guise, anyway). Considering that the Z4 sDrive30i gives little up in the way of driver enjoyment compared to its M40i counterpart, methinks a four-cylinder Supra might be just as desirable.

Rain, rain, go away… Steven Ewing/Roadshow

Editors’ note: Travel costs related to this feature were covered by the manufacturer. This is common in the auto industry, as it’s far more economical to ship journalists to cars than to ship cars to journalists. While Roadshow accepts multiday vehicle loans from manufacturers in order to provide scored editorial reviews, all scored vehicle reviews are completed on our turf and on our terms.

The judgments and opinions of Roadshow’s editorial team are our own and we do not accept paid editorial content.

Chicago Auto Show: Catch up on everything you may have missed from Chicago.

Geneva Motor Show: Get ready for the first major European auto show of the year.

Tata Motors 45X Hatchback Named ‘Altroz’ to Rival Hyundai’s i20

Tata Motors 45X Hatchback Named ‘Altroz’ to Rival Hyundai’s i20

The Tata 45X premium hatchback concept was showcased at Auto Expo 2018. 

We’re just a few weeks from the 2019 Geneva Motor Show and Tata Motors is all set to debut its production version of the 45X concept hatchback in front of the world. This is Tata’s latest product, designed with a futuristic look and it will be called the Altroz, which the company says, has been inspired from the bird Albatross.

After launching the Tiago, Tigor, Nexon, Hexa and Harrier, Tata will add the Altroz to its line up which will compete in the hatchback market against giants like the Maruti Suzuki Baleno and Hyundai’s i20 among others.

Tata has claimed that the Altroz will offer best-in-class performance and in-cabin space, which clearly suggests that the 45X concept is ready to compete with an aggressive price tag in tow.

We got a glimpse of the 45X at the 2018 Auto Expo in Delhi and what it intends to offer, without getting a hold of engine specs and other features.

But Tata has now officially confirmed that the Altroz will be its first product to be engineered on the new ALFA (Agile Light Flexible Advanced) Architecture, which will offer lightweight vehicles with a quick development cycle.

It will be interesting to hear about the Altroz, (although it may take a while to get used to the name) from the Geneva Motor Show 2019. Tata Motors plans to launch it in the Indian market in late 2019. The car has been spotted testing with heavy camouflage in various parts of India.

5 Most Affordable ADV’s In India: RE Himalayan, Kawasaki Versys-X 300, BMW G 310 GS and more

Adventure bikes are fun. We list the 5 most affordable ones you can lay your hands on

5 Most Affordable ADV’s In India: RE Himalayan, Kawasaki Versys-X 300, BMW G 310 GS and more

Adventure biking is gaining popularity these days, with enthusiast reaching further and beyond where the road ends. To do this they need a motorcycle that is adept at touring as well as negotiating the rough stuff. Here is where ADV’s come in. Their upright seating, torquey motors and long-travel suspension make light work of long-distance travels and are the perfect bikes to get Leh’d.

And you don’t have to spend top dollar to get yourself one of these capable machines either. Here’s a list of the 5 most affordable bikes you can buy right now.

Royal Enfield Himalayan (Rs 1.79 lakh ex-Delhi)

The most affordable ADV on this list is quite capable off the road. Featuring a spartan but functional bodywork on which you can fit touring luggage and jerry cans with ease, the Himalayan has presence thanks to its tall stance. It is one of the few bikes in this list to sport spoke wheels that are more durable for off-road use. It also sports the biggest front wheel here, a properly large 21-inch one, and a 17-inch rear tyre with tubed dual-purpose Ceat Gripp tyres. It gets ABS now but you can’t switch it off. Suspension setup too offers a generous amount of wheel travel: 200mm at the front and 180mm at the back. All these add up to a tall 220mm of ground clearance. Despite the tall stance, the 800mm seat height is accessible to riders of average heights. The 15-litre fuel tank should see you cover large distances before stopping for fuel. Power comes from a 411cc air-cooled single-cylinder motor that makes a modest 24.8PS at 6500rpm and 32Nm at 4250rpm. This is a torquey unit and comes mated to a 5-speed gearbox. If you plan to learn off-roading without breaking the bank, the Royal Enfield Himalayan remains your best bet.

Also read: Royal Enfield Himalayan vs Mahindra Mojo: Comparison Review

BMW G 310 GS (Rs 3.49 lakh ex-Delhi)

This baby GS is a prime example of the fact that low price does not necessarily equate good value. The G 310 GS is the second most affordable bike in this list but costs almost twice as much as the Himalayan. While the GS impresses on the design and quality fronts, it does not offer much in features other than a digital dash and switchable rear wheel ABS setup. On paper, it does get impressive kit, like the upside down front forks and rear monoshock (with 180mm of wheel travel on both sides) and 19-inch front and 17-inch rear alloy wheels with Metzeler Tourance tyres. However, the suspension is too soft and bottoms out quite easily to be of much use off-road. The 835mm seat is tall and will not find favour with average-sized riders. Its 313cc liquid-cooled single-cylinder motor makes 34PS at 9500rpm and 28Nm of torque at 7500rpm and is mated to a six-speed gearbox. However, given its gruff and vibey nature and the tiny 11-litre fuel tank, you won’t be doing much long-distance touring on one.

Also read: BMW G 310 GS: Road Test Review

Kawasaki Versys-X 300 (Rs 4.69 lakh ex-Delhi)

For Rs 1.2 lakh more than the GS, you can opt for the more capable Kawasaki Versys-X 300. Like the Himalayan, the Versys features a functional bodywork. Kawasaki offers the bike with standard features like engine guard, LED fog lamps, knuckle guards and a single-side pannier. Its USP is the 19-inch front and 17-inch rear aluminium spoke wheels fitted with dual-purpose IRC tyres that work surprisingly well both on the road and off it. While seat height at 815mm isn’t too tall, the Versys-X 300’s 180mm ground clearance is among the lowest in this group. It also has a large 17-litre fuel tank that should help give it a good range. The Versys-X 300 is the most affordable twin-cylinder ADV you can buy. It gets a 296cc liquid-cooled parallel twin motor that is good for 40PS at 11,500rpm and 25.7Nm of torque at 10,000rpm. Derived from the Ninja 300, this motor isn’t exactly suited for ADV use but you do get a shorter final gearing to help its case off the road. Compared to the Himalayan and G 310 GS, the Versys-X 300 is more viable for touring given it refined powerplant and tall windscreen.

Benelli TRK 502 and 502X (Rs 5 lakh and Rs 5.4 lakh ex-Delhi)

The newest adventure bikes here make a strong case for themselves as they are the most affordable midsize ADV’s you can buy. In fact the base TRK 502 costs just Rs 31,000 more than the Versys X-300. You have the option of a touring-friendly TRK 502, or for Rs 40,000 more you can get the more off-road-capable TRK 502X. Their USP is the large dimensions which make the bikes look more like litre-class ADV’s. With that size comes unwanted weight, all 235 kilos of it. This makes the TRK twins a whopping 14 kilos heavier than the larger Kawasaki Versys 650 and Suzuki V-Strom 650XT. That would take a toll on performance as well and that’s a downer given the 500cc liquid-cooled parallel twin motor already makes a modest 47.5PS at 8500rpm and 46Nm of torque at 6000rpm. What works in the base TRK 502’s favour is the low 800mm seat height and a large 20-litre fuel tank that should make long distance touring a quick and non-stop affair. Its large windshield and 17-inch alloys with Pirelli Angel GT touring tyres should also make it capable on tarmac. On the other hand, the more hardcore TRK 502X gets a high-mounted exhaust, tall 840mm seat, slightly longer-travel rear suspension and 19-inch front/17-inch rear spoke wheels with dual-purpose Metzeler Tourance tyres. These updates should make it more capable on the rough stuff.

Kawasaki Versys 650 (Rs 6.68 lakh ex-Delhi)

The Kawasaki Versys 650 has been around for a while and remains the sportiest midsize ADV you can buy today. Its sports-tourer-on-stilts attitude comes courtesy of a short wheelbase, adjustable Showa upside down forks with 150mm of wheel travel, an offset rear monoshock (145mm wheel travel) that can be remotely adjusted for preload, and Dunlop Sportmax tyres. However, the overall setup feels more tuned for long-distance on-road riding than off it. Its 649cc parallel twin motor too is lifted off the sportier Ninja 650. It makes 69PS at 8500rpm and 64Nm at 7000rpm. It gets a 840mm tall yet very comfortable seat but a disappointing 170mm of ground clearance. A large 21-litre fuel tank means the Versys 650 is one bike on which you can cover larger distances at a rapid pace, but will have to be careful while negotiating dirt roads.

The 296-hp VW T-Roc R elevates the hot hatch in Geneva, literally

The 296-hp VW T-Roc R elevates the hot hatch in Geneva, literally

Just because we’ll never get the compact T-Roc crossover in the US doesn’t mean we can’t get excited about it. And at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show, a new top trim has us even more smitten than before.

Volkswagen this week unveiled the T-Roc R ahead of its official debut at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. When it reaches production, it’ll be the top trim of VW’s diminutive crossover, slotting beneath the in markets outside the US. Just like the Golf R, the T-Roc R is all about fun, and it’s more than just an aesthetic adjustment.

Of course, looks do factor into VW’s R cars, and the T-Roc R is no exception. There’s a new grille up front, along with a new bumper specific to the R model. The rear bumper is equally aggressive, with a diffuser and air outlets. Jutting out from that back bumper is a shiny new exhaust system with four tailpipes — another R-car staple. 18-inch alloys are standard, but 19s are available, too.

It’s like a Golf R, but taller. Volkswagen

Inside, things should look familiar to anybody who’s been in a new VW in the last couple years. The shifter, mode knob, climate controls and infotainment system are all present in other VW vehicles like the Golf, and not much changes here between R and non-R models. That said, the R logo pops up on the steering wheel, and there’s a special infotainment startup screen for the R, as well.

Under its hood is a 2.0-liter I4 gas engine. It’s tuned to create 296 horsepower and 295 pound-feet of torque. That mates to a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission and standard all-wheel drive. This combo is enough to shove the T-Roc R to 62 miles per hour in just 4.9 seconds. Given enough pavement, it’ll hit 155 mph. It should stop on a dime, thanks to some monstrous 17-inch brakes. Launch control and a special Race mode come along for the ride, too.

The Geneva Motor Show’s press days kick off next week, so keep your eyes peeled to Roadshow for on-the-ground coverage of everything worth talking about at the show.

Toyota: The clever Corolla returns

Toyota: The clever Corolla returns

The Corolla is generally a very pleasant car to drive (Image: NC)

Now, though, they’ll be selling you a Corolla. And if that name sounds familiar, there’s good reason: that’s what Toyota had called its car in this class for some 40 years since it was launched back in 1966. This new hatchback is being built in Britain – just as the Auris was – at Toyota’s plant in Derbyshire but the new name is indicative of just how much has changed over its predecessor. Most obviously, it looks very different – as bold and distinctive as the Auris was drab and anonymous.

The Corolla’s slim headlights and sharp nose make it stand out a mile from its rivals – and there’s even the option of a two-tone finish on the most expensive models.

There are three bodystyles to choose from and each fulfils a different need. The hatchback is expected to be by far the most popular and is aimed at urban couples, while the estate (called the Touring Sports) is the most family-friendly model.

For the first time, the range also includes a saloon and that will appeal to loyal Toyota customers who previously bought an Avensis which is no longer on sale. With a line-up like that, the Corolla follows very much in the wheeltracks of the Auris. There are three engines to choose from but one of the biggest differences is that there is no turbo-diesel engine on offer.

The cheapest Corolla comes with a regular 1.2-litre petrol engine with 114bhp but the biggest sellers will be the pair of petrol-electric hybrids. The cheaper option (and the only one in the saloon) uses a 1.8-litre petrol engine, while the other has a 2.0-litre unit.

Picking between the two depends on your priorities. If you want the best average fuel economy, go for the 120bhp 1.8-litre which can return up to 65.9mpg. But if you want more performance then the 2.0-litre is the way to go with its 178bhp. True, you’ll need to have an extra £1,700 or so but with a 0 to 60mph time of 7.9 seconds, it’s three seconds quicker to 60mph and you don’t have to pay too high a price in economy, as it’s still capable of 60.6mpg.

The Corolla’s rear end is compact and rather sleek looking (Image: NC)

It’s also the more pleasant engine to live with, as the extra power is very useful. Not so much because it makes the car much quicker but because the 2.0-litre doesn’t need to be worked as hard as the 1.8, it’s much quieter.

The 1.8-litre engine is rather vocal when revved hard – and you’ll be surprised how often that happens. You don’t need to ask for that much extra acceleration or encounter that much of a hill before the electronic brain in the Corolla asks the engine for maximum power.

The irony is that Toyota has managed to keep the cabin very quiet otherwise, so that noise is all the more noticeable.

On the other hand, if you keep the Corolla at a steady pace, you won’t have such problems. In fact, it’s generally a very pleasant car to drive. Thanks to the automatic gearbox and light steering, it’s easy around town, while the hybrid system means that it’s virtually silent when it’s running on electric power. Then, on a steady motorway cruise, you can really revel in the quiet and cover mile after mile in real comfort.

ACROSS country too, it’s a very decent car to drive, feeling sure-footed and very composed through a series of bends. It isn’t as involving and engaging as a Ford Focus but instead the Corolla is more like the Volkswagen Golf, in that it’s comfortable and naturally forces you into a more relaxed driving style which many drivers will prefer. Inside, too, the Corolla stands up well when you compare it with the Golf which is some praise, as the VW is among the very best for comfort and quality. Particularly in the models with higher trims, the Corolla looks and feels very classy.

The touchscreen and steering wheel are very involved (Image: NC)

It’s also very comfortable. The driving position is excellent, with plenty of adjustment on the driver’s seat and steering wheel, and there’s enough head and legroom even for six-footers.

To control the infotainment system, you use the eight-inch touchscreen on the top of the dashboard. It does take a little while to find what you want in the menus but the shortcut buttons around the edge of the screen are very helpful in allowing you to jump between the various functions very easily. However, rather disappointingly neither Apple CarPlay nor Android Auto are available.

To make matters worse, the instrument display has too much information to read at a glance and you can say the same about the steering wheel. There are so many buttons on it that you have to look down to make sure that you press the right one.

In the back, too, the Corolla hatchback isn’t up with its best rivals. Anyone near or taller than six foot will find their knees hard up against the back of the front seats and their heads brushing the roof. It would be fine for a couple of children but if you need more space, it’s worth considering either the saloon or estate which have a little more room in the back.

Similarly, the boot in the hatchback is good but not the best. The problem is not that it’s tiny, but that the high lip and wide bumper make it awkward to load and unload. And if you fold down the split-fold rear seats to extend the space, they leave a big lump in the floor which makes it difficult to slide long items inside.

Nevertheless, the Corolla still makes a very tempting package, particularly as a company car. The low emissions make for low tax bills and even if you buy the car yourself, you’ll appreciate the good fuel economy and high levels of standard equipment – with superb safety features being a particular selling point.

Overall it is a car you choose with your head but the sharp style and decent drive mean there’s plenty to appeal to the heart too.

Citroen reveals concept car that meets Europe’s quadricycle norms

Citroen reveals concept car that meets Europe's quadricycle norms

Ami One’s panels are duplicated, side to side, where possible

Future demands of the world’s cities mean electric power is a must

Minimalist ethos carries over to the interior

Instruments and a head-up display are the only electrics inside

Each tail-light uses just two LEDS

Citroen has unveiled a tiny city car concept ahead of its public debut at the Geneva motor show next month.

The Ami One is a two-seat show car that meets Europe’s quadricycle regulations. That means it’s less than 1.5m wide, has a top speed of 28mph (45 kph) and weighs less than 450kg. As a result, it could, in some countries, be driven without a driving licence.

The concept explores some of the issues facing makers of very small cars as consumers turn to bigger models or stop buying cars entirely.

“The young are connected to use, not ownership,” said Citroën’s senior vice-president of product and strategy, Xavier Peugeot. “To me, Ami One is not a car. There are people for who mobility is not an object.”

The Ami One is intended to be a vehicle whose use would be shared at least as much as it’s privately owned, so it is built simply and cheaply and to be tough.

“The materials are all chosen for durability,” said Frederic Duvernier, Citroen’s head of concept cars, who led the design of the Ami One.

To cut production costs, there’s a huge reduction in the number of components required to make the Ami One. The front and rear windows are different but otherwise, body panels are common across sides wherever possible.

Both doors are the same, so the driver’s door is rear-hinged, the passenger side conventional; the orange panels below the windscreen and rear window are common; the chevron-ribbed sills are common across four sides; and every wheel arch is an identical moulding. Exterior badging is all by decal and the rear lights use only two LEDs apiece.

Onboard electrical content is paired back, too. The Ami One integrates with the entertainment and navigation systems of a smartphone, whose screen it mirrors onto a head-up display and which the driver controls by voice. That and the instruments are where the car’s only interior electrics lie. The windows are either open or closed, not electrically operated, and the 2CV-style fold-back roof is hand operated.

According to Citroen CEO Linda Jackson, although the Ami One is not cited for production, it does explore what Citroën’s city cars could become, given the segment’s dwindling number of buyers.

“When you see the size of the segment, and people moving to B-segment and B-SUVs, we’ll not straight replace the C1,” she said. “What is the evolution? We’re talking urban areas and car sharing, though you might want ownership. Anything for cities means electric. We need to look at the A-segment and what is the next answer. Maybe it is the Ami One.”

The Ami One won’t just be static at the Geneva show but will be driven around the stand.

Honda Navi CBS Launched In India

The Navi will be the sixth scooter in Honda’s scooter lineup to feature CBS

  • The CBS variant is priced at Rs 47,110 (ex-showroom Delhi).
  • Commands a premium of Rs 1,768 over the standard Honda Navi.
  • Is offered in six different colours – red, white, black, brown, green and orange.
  • The Honda Aviator and Cliq still miss out on CBS (Combined Braking System).
Honda Navi CBS Launched In India

Honda has updated its quirky little Navi with the safety net of CBS (Combined Braking System). At a sticker price of Rs 47,110 (ex-showroom, Delhi), the CBS variant carries a premium of Rs 1,768 over the standard version, which is a bit too steep to be honest. To put things into perspective, a few bikemakers are offering the tech at a premium of just Rs 500 to Rs 800. A bit ironical, given Honda were the pioneers of CBS technology in India.

The Navi is the sixth scooter in Honda’s current scooter lineup to feature CBS. That said, with the government safety norms looming large, we could soon expect the Aviator and Cliq to get a similar treatment pretty soon too. Coming back to the Honda Navi, it’s powered by a 109.19cc, single-cylinder engine that produces 8PS of power at 7,000rpm and 8.94Nm of torque at 5,500rpm. It gets a rather small 3.5-litre fuel tank.

The Navi is Honda’s unique approach to a monkey bike, albeit with more practicality and an automatic transmission. Moreover, weighing in at just 100kg, the Navi is a nimble handler. Its suspension setup includes a conventional telescopic fork up front and a monoshock at the rear. Braking is handled by 130mm drum brakes at both ends. Its 12-inch front and 10-inch rear wheels come shod in 90/90 and 90/100-sections tyres respectively. In terms of competition, the Honda Navi has none, and enjoys a free rein in its segment. It’s offered in six different shades – red, white, black, brown, green and orange.

SsangYong reveals 2019 Korando; could inspire next-gen XUV500

SsangYong reveals 2019 Korando; could inspire next-gen XUV500

The SUV is set to make its debut at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show in March.

South Korea based carmaker SsangYong has revealed the 2019 Korando in images. The SUV is set to make its debut at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show in March and is likely to inspire the next generation Mahindra XUV500. The Korando sits between the Tivoli and the G4 Rexton in SsangYong’s lineup.

SsangYong to showcase next-gen Korando SUV at the Geneva Motor Show in March.

It is based on the modified X100 platform that also underpins the Tivoli and XUV300.

New Korando borrows styling cues from SIV-2 concept showcased earlier.

To get a new 1.6-litre turbo diesel engine.

Could be launched as the next-gen XUV500 in India.

Mahindra’s South Korean subsidiary SsangYong has revealed more details about the 2019 Korando SUV, which is set to make its global debut at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show next month. Likely to inspire the next generation Mahindra XUV500, the 2019 Korando sits between the Tivoli and the G4 Rexton in Ssangyong’s global lineup.

Based on the stretched version of the X100 platform which also underpins the Tivoli and the recently launched Mahindra XUV300, the new Korando borrows design cues from the G4 Rexton and the SIV-2 concept that was showcased at the 2016 Geneva Motor Show.

Like its Korean counterpart, the XUV500 also sits between the recently launched XUV300 and the Alturas G4 in India, and could share the modified platform from the Korando here. This will be the only unibody platform in Mahindra’s portfolio apart from the two ladder frame platforms that underpin the Alturas G4 and the Marazzo MPV.

Inside, the new Korando gets the ‘Blaze Cockpit’ design, which in line with modern SUV standards, incorporates a 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment system and a 9-inch digital instrument panel, giving the dashboard a premium appeal. It also gets mood lighting along with brown-and-black dual-tone upholstery to further accentuate the interior design.

Under the bonnet, the new Korando will be powered by an all-new 1.6-litre turbo-diesel engine. While the official specs haven’t been disclosed yet, the Korando is also likely to feature the 1.5-litre turbo petrol engine co-developed with Mahindra.

The Korando could also get electrified powertrains as well. And if not immediately, the next-gen XUV500 could also get them in India at a later stage. The Korando will be Ssangyong’s first all-electric SUV globally.

In terms of safety, the new Korando will offer a range of driving assistance features such as intelligent adaptive cruise control, Lane Keep Assist (LKAS), auto emergency braking (AEB), Driver Attention Alert (DAA) as well as “Safety Distance Alert,” (somewhat like a collision warning system).

Since SsangYong was acquired by Mahindra way back in 2011, the latter has made strong strides in enhancing and widening its SUV portfolio in India. Whether it is the Alturas G4 or the recently launched XUV300, we have seen strong synergies between the two carmakers time and again. And with the new Korando, we can expect Mahindra to yet again use its learnings in the next generation XUV500 as well.