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India’s First Electric Bike With 4G Sim Access And AI Technology

Revolt unveils India’s first electric bike model with Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technology.You can find more information about the features in this article.

Revolt Intellicorp is an electric bike company started by Rahul Sharma, co-founder of Micromax.The company has launched their first electric bike named as Revolt RV400 in india.This new electric bike looks similar to KTM Duke in appearance,but some of the features made them unique.

India's First Electric Bike With 4G Sim Access And AI Technology

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The Revolt RV 400 bike is equipped with LED lights, a full digital instrument cluster and more. This digital instrument cluster can be accessed directly via 4G SIM card. Also, it can be connected to a smartphone via Bluetooth.

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The bike can be started with a smartphone app and a voice command system. The owner can choose one of four types of silencer sounds on this bike.

The battery in this bike can make the bike to travel up to 156km once charged.The battery can take up to 4 hours to get fully charged.The battery can be easily removed and charged. Also, Revolt is also planning to provide a charged battery on request raised by a smartphone app.The bike can reach a maximum speed of 85 km/h.

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The Revolt RV400 bike can be booked online through revolt website (or) Amazon website by paying Rs 1000 as a deposit from today.The bike was expected to be sold at ₹1 lahk as on-road price.

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5 Most Popular Mobile Games in India

Console games are the most popular type of video games in the world with approximately 600 million people playing on a console. India is a nation full of gamers, but a lot of them play on either PC or on smart phones. There is still a large number who play video games on a console.

Many video games, no matter the era, have become firm favorites among Indian gamers. From games released in the early 2000s to the latest ones in 2018, there is a whole range of console games which are popular to play in India.

Candy Crush Saga

5 Most Popular Mobile Games in India

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Downloaders : Above 500 Million

Size : 83 MB

Rating : 4.5

Thousands of levels and straightforward gameplay make Candy Crush Saga the most popular mobile game in India. Switching and pairing the sweets is the aim to progress through the levels of this wonderfully addictive game. Playing with friends or alone provides players with different options and appeals to wider audiences. A network connection lets players look at leaderboards to compare with others.

Ludo King

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Downloaders : Above 100 Million

Size : 35 MB

Rating : 4.4

Based on the classic board game loved by many. Roll the Ludo dice and move your counters to make it to the centre of the board. Beat the other players to become the Ludo King. The classic game is modernized for phones and there are a variety of ways to play. Play offline against the computer or against family members. Or go online and play against different players around the world to become the best.

Clash of Clans

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Downloaders : Above 500 Million

Size : 100 MB

Rating : 4.6

Millions of players build villages, raise clans and use them to battle against other clans. A strategy game which requires you to defend your village from other players while upgrading your own clan. Competing online is the main feature of Clash of Clans, however, casual players can invite friends to play in friendly challenges which takes the competitive edge off.

Subway Surfers

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Downloaders : Above 1 Billion

Size : 30 MB

Rating : 4.5

A fast-paced game where the objective is to collect as many coins as possible all while avoiding oncoming trains. Colourful and vivid HD graphics make this simple game more appealing to players. This addictive game keeps players entertained for a long time as they try to beat their high score. The simple controls are what has made this game liked worldwide, let alone India.

PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (PUBG)

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Downloaders : Above 100 Million

Size : 1.54 GB

Rating : 4.5

PUBG is in first rank in our list. PUBG MOBILE is currently the most popular video game in India right now followed by other BR games like Fortnite, Free Fire etc and some others like COC, CR and MLBB. It has now 100 Million downloaders but it is becoming much famous in India.

Players either play solo or they can team up with friends to have a better chance of surviving the battle. Battle Royale style games against many online opponents are globally enjoyed, both on mobile and console versions. Mobile formats are especially popular among players in Asia, due to the cost of consoles. PUBG mobile is currently the third most popular mobile game in India and it’s easy to see why.

Lucknow 49, London: ‘Occasionally it knocks your socks off’ – restaurant review

Lucknow 49, London: ‘Occasionally it knocks your socks off’ – restaurant review

‘The interior is a self-conscious take on the domestic’: Lucknow 49. Photograph: Sophia Evans/The Observer

Lucknow 49, 49 Maddox Street, London W1S 2PQ (020 7491 9191). Starters £6-£16; mains £12-£17.50; desserts £6; wines from £29

While it would be wrong to argue that most of the Indian subcontinent’s food is brown, it’s easy to see how a meal at Lucknow 49, the second London enterprise from chef Dhruv Mittal, might make you reach that conclusion. It’s a parade of dishes which, on a colour chart, would run the gamut from “dark earth” through “silted river bed” all the way to “ploughed field”. Personally, I have no problem with brown food; some of the most intense, strident dishes I have ever eaten have been brown. In cooking, caramelisation is your friend and caramel is brown. Others feel differently. Which may explain why, half way through dinner, I find myself staring at a lightly sauced cauliflower, dressed with a thin scab of shimmering silver leaf.

The star is the raan masala, lamb in a deep sauce. It’s a boisterous bit of overtly butch cookery. Come for this

Some will protest that precious metals as food decoration is a cultural thing, with a venerable history in Indian cookery. But I’m not in India. I’m on Maddox Street on the edge of London’s Mayfair, where there’s already too much pointless gilding. I don’t like eating things which serve no nutritional purpose. I particularly don’t like eating things which are destined to travel straight through me so that the product at the other end turns out so glittery you could hang it on a Christmas tree if, say, Tim Burton was in charge of the decorations.

Apart from offering the opportunity to make poo jokes in a restaurant review – never to be missed – there’s a more serious point here. How do we evaluate a restaurant like this, where the substantial bill clearly pays for things like silver leaf on the cauliflower, which have nothing to do with the food? For a start, Lucknow 49 is a very comfortable restaurant, literally so. The upholstered bench seating is stacked with throw cushions and bolsters – so many, indeed, that I have to chuck a few off to create a space in which to wriggle my sizeable arse. There is olive green paintwork, as well as what looks like hand-printed decoration around the archway into the back-dining room, and blocky floral prints. It’s a self-conscious take on the domestic, the sort of relaxed style that costs proper money. Accordingly, the cheapest bottle of wine is £29 for something drinkable the name of which I can’t recall, and the dinner bill for two will easily break £130.

‘Offered on the bone, to which strands cling with little resolve’: raan masala Photograph: Sophia Evans/The Observer

Let’s stop there for a moment. The fact that you can visit a serviceable high-street curry house and pay buttons for indeterminate animal protein batch-cooked in a glowing sauce, which will repeat on you for days, does not mean food from the Indian tradition should never cost as much as that from France, Italy or Japan. If you believe that, you are dismissing the whole of Indian culture as somehow inferior. You will need to have a long hard talk with yourself.

The food just needs to be worth it. At Lucknow 49, some of it pretty much is and some of it really isn’t. (The £9 paratha wraps stuffed with grilled lamb for takeaway at lunchtime may be the best deal). It all comes with a compelling narrative: after the fall of the Mughal empire, the royal family and their cooks shifted from Delhi to Lucknow. The double lamb chops here, cooked over charcoal, are big, meaty beasts, with a fine char, hot, crisped fat, and the rising scent of newly roasted spices. Lucky royal family. The online menu shows them to be £12.50 for two, which is good value for this quantity and quality of meat. I assume it was too much value, because at the restaurant these terrific chops are actually £16. There are a few examples of this, which a polite person would describe as unfortunate. The menu has been updated since my visit.

‘Ignore the silliness of the silver leaf’: cauliflower. Photograph: Sophia Evans/The Observer

Boned chicken thighs are marinated in a saffron-flavoured cream before being charcoal grilled and are buttery and rich in all the right places. They are proof, if needed, that thigh wins out over breast every time. Potato and green chilli patties are sturdy rather than impressive. Flatbreads, stuffed with lentils and rice dumplings and a heavy dollop of yogurt and chutney, make up the numbers rather than thrill.

Of the mains the true star is the raan masala. A classic raan recipe calls for a leg of lamb to be roasted for at least six hours and for as much as a day, until it has all but fallen apart into its deep dark sauce, with the edge of that caramel which comes with the virtuous interaction of meat and heat. Here, it is offered on the bone, to which strands cling with little resolve. It’s a boisterous bit of overtly butch cookery. Come here for this.

If you can ignore the silliness of the silver leaf, there’s an equal heft to the cauliflower dish in its own dun-coloured sauce. Most importantly it has been timed perfectly. It could have been so much watery mush to be gummed away, but the cauliflower has tension and bite. Whole quail steamed in a stridently spiced gravy points up one of the issues with this kind of cookery. When a sauce is so multilayered and full on, the meat under it could be anything; quail is delicate and doesn’t quite stand up to this armed assault, but the dish is not an unwelcome presence. Dhruv Mittal announced himself previously with a restaurant in Soho called Dum Biryani which, unsurprisingly, focused on pots of baked, accessorised rice. Curiously it is the goat biryani here which is the least impressive or generous. It’s just a little dry and meagre. The meat is tough.

‘A little dry’: goat biryani. Photograph: Sophia Evans/The Observer

Still there is a luscious, albeit small serving of dal makhani for £7 with which to lubricate it. Finally, there are a couple of extremely sweet desserts, a carrot halwa and a milk cake with alphonso mango, to detain you, although not for very long. This is one of those moments where not only do I have to separate the impact of silver leaf from the underlying dish, but also my very pleasant night out from the cost of the experience.

Understand Lucknow 49 as a relaxed Indian restaurant in London’s Mayfair that will only occasionally knock your socks off, but will still show you a nice time along the way, and you won’t be disappointed. Bizarrely, in a complex London restaurant sector that’s sometimes tricky to navigate, it’s more of a recommendation than it might seem.

News bites

Maddox Street has long been home to a bunch of serious places to eat. They’re never cheap – this is London’s Mayfair, after all – but some are very good indeed. Among those is the original branch of Goodman, which is firmly in the premier division of steakhouses. There’s a strong choice of both breeds and cuts, all treated with due care and attention, as well as killer sides like the Josper grilled tomatoes and the truffle mash (goodmanrestaurants.com).

While we’re in the area I have to record my dismay at the closure of Mark Jarvis’s restaurant Stem, just around the corner from Maddox Street on Princes Street. It was that rare thing: a small bistro knocking out cracking food at a reasonable price. Jarvis has blamed the closure on building works in the area which have harmed business and says they may come up with another plan for the site. I’ll keep my fingers crossed.

Meanwhile, in Manchester, the soon-to-open Stock Exchange Hotel has announced that the food and beverage operation will be overseen by Tom Kerridge of the Hand and Flowers. “We’ll be bringing a bit of Marlow up to Manchester,” Kerridge said.

Savour Monsoon With Savoury Waffles!

Savour Monsoon With Savoury Waffles!

Cravings waffles? Indulge in waffles with Le Cafe’s savoury twist to it. You can bite into their Corn Cheddar Waffle or splurge on the Fried Chicken one!

Enjoy a wholesome meal without loosing the nutritional value. Le  Cafe offers Corn Cheddar  Waffles served with Chipotle Mayonnaise for the vegetarians and Fried Chicken Waffle topped with Green Chilli & Mint Mayonnaise for the meat lovers.

Which one would you go for?WHAT: Savoury Waffles At Le CafeWHEN: All Day!WHERE:  Jewel of chembur, 1st Road, Opp Bmc OFFice, Near Natraj Cinema, Chembur Gaothan, Chembur, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400071

More than just Kimchi

Korean cuisine may seem exotic and complex, but given that there are several commonalities with Indian cuisine, it’s well worth a try!

More than just Kimchi

Kimchi

With the growing hype around Korean dramas and K-Pop bands, India is slowly opening its doors to Korean cuisine as well. It may sound exotic and far-reaching to begin with, but a closer look reveals that Korean food is not all that different from its Indian counterpart.

In fact, Korean food is known to be hearty in its portions with rice being the core ingredient for most of its dishes. Even the popular spices used in Korean cooking — primarily cinnamon — feature in most of our own Indian dishes.

The classic Bibimbap is one of the most talked about Korean dishes and a visual treat. The literal translation of the name suggests that it is an all-encompassing bowl of rice with minced meat and vegetables as accompaniments. The best part of this Korean dish is its versatility. You can easily alter it to your taste and dietary preferences.

While most of us feel hesitant in incorporating an alien cuisine in our lives over the fear of exotic ingredients priced exorbitantly, this is not the case with Korean cuisine. Most of the ingredients used can be easily found in our own local markets and kitchens.

A popular Korean dipping sauce and sometimes the core ingredient for its dishes is sesame oil. In fact, Korean food is incomplete without this nutty aromatic addition to its dishes. Widely used in our own cooking, sesame oil is known to have some great health benefits too.

Another Korean essential is coconut milk, largely used in the southern parts of India; coconut milk gives a sweet and smooth flavour to the dishes.

Like Indian food, Korean food can sometimes be extremely rich in spices, so the addition of coconut milk not only adds a layer of flavour but also ties the whole dish together. Try your hand at these exotic but easy to make Korean dishes.

Korean Bibimbap (serves 4)

Ingredients:

Preparation:

Accompaniments for the Bibimbap:

Cooking:

Serve:

— Chef Sanjay Kak (Culinary Director IIHM)

Bokkeumbap

Ingredients:

Preparation:

Process

Kimchi

Ingredients:

Method:

Hauz Qazi clashes: 3 arrested, MP Harsh Vardhan appeals for harmony

Hauz Qazi clashes: 3 arrested, MP Harsh Vardhan appeals for harmony

Security personnel conduct route march after clashes broke out between the people of two communities in Delhi’s Hauz Qazi area on Monday. (Photo: IANS)

Union Minister and Chandni Chowk lawmaker, Dr Harsh Vardhan, on Tuesday morning visited Hauz Qazi area, where a clash broke out between two groups over the issue of parking, and a temple was vandalised on Sunday night.

“It is very unfortunate and painful. The kind of things done to the temple is unforgivable. I have been told that Police is already in action, culprits will be arrested soon and punished. I appeal to the people to maintain harmony,” Harsh Vardhan said.

Security has been tightened in the area. Three people, including a juvenile, have been arrested over the matter.

The Delhi Police have registered three FIRs in this case – two cross FIRs, one lodged by each community, and one for vandalising the temple.

Apart from temple desecration, stones were also pelted in the area leading to a tense situation.

“After some altercation &scuffle over a parking issue in Hauz Qazi, tension arose between two groups of people from different communities.We have taken legal action & all efforts are being made to pacify feelings &bring about amity. People are requested to help in restoring normalcy,” Deputy Commissioner of Police, Central Delhi had tweeted yesterday.

National Women Comm issues notice to Telangana DGP after attack on Forest officer

National Women Comm issues notice to Telangana DGP after attack on Forest officer

Days after violence broke out at Sarsala village in Telangana, where a forest officer, Anitha, was attacked by a stick-wielding mob and had to be rushed to a hospital for treatment, the National Commission for Women (NCW) has taken note of the incident.

“The Commission is seriously concerned about the brutal crime targeted against officials and women in particular performing their duty,” the NCW said in a notice addressed to Telangana Director of General Police (DGP) Mahender Reddy.

The notice was signed by the NCW Chairperson Rekha Sharma.

“Considering the gravity of the matter, I request you to ensure swift and speedy investigation in the matter and send a detailed action taken report to the Commission at an early date by e-mail/fax,” the letter added.

The violence had broken out during an afforestation programme taken up by the state government. TRS leader Koneru Krishna, the brother of Sirpur MLA Koneru Konappa, was arrested for leading the mob.

In a press note, the Forest Divisional Officer in Kagaznagar alleged that the MLA’s brother and some locals carried out the attack as they had a ‘mala fide intention’ to occupy the Reserve Forest land. However, locals claimed that they had been cultivating the land for decades.

On Monday, a similar incident took place as two forest officials were attacked, allegedly after they stopped some locals from ploughing forest land with a tractor in the limits of Gundalapadu village in Bhadradri Kothagudem district.

In another incident on Monday, TRS MLA from Kothagudem, Vanama Venkateshwara Rao and his son Raghava, were booked for allegedly obstructing forest officials from doing their duty at Lothuvagu village in Kothagudem district. Forest Range Officer MRP Rao complained to the local police that the MLA, his son, and three others had abused the forest staff at Lothuvagu.

Meanwhile, under heavy police security on Monday, officials continued the afforestation programme and planted 22,000 saplings in the contentious site of forest land, spread over 20 hectares, at Sarasala village.

Auto industry icon Lee Iacocca dies at 94

Auto industry icon Lee Iacocca dies at 94

Auto executive and master pitchman who put the Mustang in Ford’s lineup in 1960, Lee Iacocca passed away at the age of 94 in Bel Air, California. Former Chrysler executives and his colleagues, Bud Liebler and Bob Lutz said they were informed of the death by Iacocca’s close associate.

His 32-year career at Ford and Chrysler helped him launch some of Detroit’s best-selling and most significant vehicles, including the minivan, The Chrysler K-cars and the Ford Escort. He also spoke against what he considered unfair trade practices by Japanese automakers.

As compared to others, Iacocca reached the level of celebrity matched by a few auto moguls. During the peak of his popularity in the 80s, he was famous for his TV ads and catchy taglines like ‘If you can find a better car, buy it’. He also penned two best-selling books and was courted as a potential presidential candidate.

The automobile sensation will be best remembered as the blunt-talking, cigar-chomping Chrysler chief who helped engineer a great corporate turnaround.

His former colleagues said Iacocca had a larger-than-life presence that commanded attention and that he was a leader. In recent years, he was battling Parkinson’s disease, but nobody was sure of the real cause of his death.

Liebler, who worked with Iacocca for more than a decade said he was the last of an era of brash, charismatic executives who could yield results and added that Lee made money without failing to deliver the promises he made.

In 1979, Chrysler was floundering in $5 billion of debt and had a bloated manufacturing system that was turning out gas-guzzlers that the public didn’t want. And when the banks turned him down, Iacocca and the United Auto Workers union helped persuade the government to approve $1.5 billion in loan guaranteed that kept the no.3 domestic automaker afloat.

Amsterdam’s first woman mayor plans red light district overhaul

Amsterdam's first woman mayor plans red light district overhaul

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Amsterdam’s first female mayor launched plans on Wednesday to overhaul the city’s red light district and its window displays, in a bid to protect sex workers from gawping tourists.

Mayor of Amsterdam Femke Halsema poses for a portrait in Amsterdam, Netherlands June 26, 2019. REUTERS/Piroschka van de Wouw

In what would be the most radical revamp of the sex trade there since the Dutch legalized prostitution nearly two decades ago, Femke Halsema suggested stopping the practice of sex workers standing in window-fronted rooms, among other options.

Changes were needed because of social shifts, she told Reuters, including the rise of human trafficking and an increase in the number of tourists visiting the district and using their phones to take and post pictures of the women.

“We’re forced by circumstances because Amsterdam changes,” Halsema said in an interview before the launch.

“I think a lot of the women who work there feel humiliated, laughed at and that’s one of the reasons we are thinking about changing,” she added.

The plans included four main scenarios: ending street window displays, closing down city center brothels and moving them elsewhere, reducing the number of city center brothels and stepping up the licensing of window workers.

The scenarios, drawn up in a report titled “The Future of Window Prostitution in Amsterdam”, also included a broader proposal for an “erotic city zone” that would have a clear entrance gate, similar to a system used in Hamburg, she added.

Those options will be presented to residents and businesses at town hall meetings this month before one chosen and put to a vote in the city council later this year, Halsema said.

Past efforts to control the red light district have faced opposition from sex workers and businesses involved in the lucrative trade.

The mayor said there were no plans to outlaw prostitution outright.

“We legalized prostitution because we thought and still think that legal prostitution give a woman a chance to be autonomous, independent. Criminalizing prostitution has been done in the United States, I think, makes women extra vulnerable.”

The changes had three main aims, she said, to protect women from degrading work conditions, to cut crime and to revive the 500-year-old neighborhood which, along with Amsterdam’s canals, is part of a UNESCO world heritage site.

One sex worker and member of PROUD, a union defending the prostitutes’ interests, told Reuters the women there were facing increasingly disrespectful behavior.

“The tourists don’t know how to behave themselves in this area,” said the women who declined to give her name.

Italian Social-Democrat David Sassoli Elected European Parliament President

Italian Social-Democrat David Sassoli Elected European Parliament President

The European Parliament held a second round of voting for the president, because none of the four candidates secured a majority in the first round.

David-Maria Sassoli, an Italian politician from the Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats has been elected the European Parliament President.

.@DavidSassoli was elected President of the European Parliament with 345 votes out of the 667 valid votes cast pic.twitter.com/PBbOtUOBPF— EP PressService (@EuroParlPress) 3 июля 2019 г.

​In the first round of voting, Sassoli received 325 votes. Jan Zahradil, a Czech politician from the European Conservatives and Reformists, received 162 votes. Ska Keller, a German politician of the Greens, secured 133 votes. Spaniard Sira Rego of the European United Left-Nordic Green Left garnered 42 votes.

EP President election: 

1st ballot: 662 valid votes cast, majority: 332. 

S. Keller: 133, S. Rego: 42, D. Sassoli: 325, J. Zahradil: 162



Second ballot starts 11.40. 

The candidates remain the same @SkaKeller , @sirarego , @DavidSassoli & @ZahradilJanpic.twitter.com/twgogzm97M— EP PressService (@EuroParlPress) 3 июля 2019 г.

Sassoli secured 345 votes in the second ballot. The absolute majority required is 334 votes.

New Heads of Main EU Institutions

A day earlier, EU leaders announced their picks to head key EU institutions after days of wrangling.

The European Council chose German Defence Minister Ursula von der Leyen as a candidate for president of the European Commission. She will need the backing of a majority at the European Parliament to head the commission.

Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel was named the new president of the European Council.

Christine Lagarde of the International Monetary Fund was submitted as a candidate for president of the European Central Bank (ECB). Her nomination needs support from the European Parliament and the ECB’s Governing Council.

Spanish Foreign Minister Josep Borell is considered as a candidate for High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy. He will be confirmed by the Commission’s president-elect.​